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Bourne End to Windsor an 11.5 mile walk along the Thames.

This walk is just a section of the Thames river, our project this year is to complete it - please click this link to view the other walks along the river.


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Dorney Lake
Another section completed along the banks of the Thames river, this time from the royal city of Windsor to Bourne end. We parked the car in Bourne end train station costing just £2 on a Saturday , then we got the train to Windsor. You will need to change train twice on the journey one at Maidenhead and again at slough before arriving at Windsor & Eton central. Once in Windsor we walked the short distance down to the footpath along the Thames, soon after you lose the crowds and find the first thing of interest on the opposite bank Royal Windsor racecourse, this has run races dating back from 1866 with the big race the Royal Windsor stakes being held in May.

Dorney Lake
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A Bit further down the Thames Path you come across Dorney Lake site of the 2012 olympic rowing events. The lake is privately owned and financed by Eton College, which spent £17 million developing it. Additional grants, totalling £500,000, were obtained from Sport England, UK Sport, the DCMS and SEEDA in order to build the lake's finish tower. The project was completed in 2006, after 10 years of construction.[1] Although it is primarily for use by the school, the facilities are hired out for rowing, as well as for canoeing, dragon boating, open water swimming and triathlon.
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From Dorney lake we follow the path under the M4 motorway bridge where I got a picture and again under the Main Train line to Paddington station where we found a bridge designed by Isambard Brunel and was completed by 1838. Brunel's first plan envisaged a triple-arch viaduct, but he then developed the design that is still used today.[3] It was inspired by experiments made by his father, Marc Brunel in 1832 which Isambard had at the time financed.[4] The railway is carried across the river on two elliptical brick arches, which at the time of building were the widest and flattest in the world.[5][6] Each span is 128 feet (39 m), with a rise of only 24 feet (7 m).
We passed the Cliveden Estate on the opposite bank and passed into the little village of Cookham, make sure you spend a little time here its a nice looking place. We finally headed into the village of Bourne end and another good walk along this river was completed.



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Cookham Church



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